Perspectives on Polling: Part 3 of a 4-part series – Calgary Centre: An Odd Case of Public Engagement

Based on articles published in the Globe and Mail and on the Market Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) blog, this extended 4-part series looks at what’s wrong with political polling in Canada (and elsewhere) and asserts that it can and must be fixed. Drawing on his own experience in both the political and market research arenas, and from his interviews with thought leaders and pollsters from across Canada and the US, Brian F. Singh points critiques conventional polling methods that are perpetuated by pollsters and passed on to the public by the media, and concludes with a 5-point call to action for the market research industry.

Perspectives on Polling – Part 2 of a 4-part series: The horse race ignores context and nuance

Based on articles published in the Globe and Mail and on the Market Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) blog, this extended 4-part series looks at what’s wrong with political polling in Canada (and elsewhere) and asserts that it can and must be fixed. Drawing on his own experience in both the political and market research arenas, and from his interviews with thought leaders and pollsters from across Canada and the US, Brian F. Singh points critiques conventional polling methods that are perpetuated by pollsters and passed on to the public by the media, and concludes with a 5-point call to action for the market research industry.

Perspectives on Polling – Part 1 of a 4-part series: The problem with polling (and pollsters)

Based on articles published in the Globe and Mail and on the Market Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) blog, this extended 4-part series looks at what’s wrong with political polling in Canada (and elsewhere) and asserts that it can and must be fixed. Drawing on his own experience in both the political and market research arenas, and from his interviews with thought leaders and pollsters from across Canada and the US, Brian F. Singh points critiques conventional polling methods that are perpetuated by pollsters and passed on to the public by the media, and concludes with a 5-point call to action for the market research industry.

“It took a threat from the right to revive democracy in this province.” – Brian F. Singh

Apart from the surprising majority earned by the Alberta PCs on April 23, much attention has also been paid to the equally surprising performance of the pollsters, virtually all of whom got it wrong, maintaining that the upsurging Wildrose Party would end more than 40 years of Tory reign. In his comments quoted in two articles ...

Riding the Change Wave: Architecting Market Research for the Future – Leonard Murphy (Net Gain 6.0 Presentation)

Key points raised: Connecting the dots to identify different trends. Future role of market researchers: consult, synthesize, tell a story, take a stand. Clients are demanding industry to change. Drivers of change: New competitors, social media, data collection is a commodity, economics, business intelligence, technology. Large players – IBM, Google, SAP – moving into insight space. Consumers: seeking engagement, socialization, fun ...

Social Media Strategy: “Dirt Cheap Labour” meet Game Theory

In the social media stampede, how long would free be truly “free?" I just read the article “Dirt cheap labour - How businesses are getting the public to work for them for free” by Stephanie Findlay in the Business section of Macleans' online magazine, published last week. Check it out. OK. Let's repeat the question: How long ...